Welcome to the home of pretty pictures and my random thoughts.

 

girldoesnothing:

tonidorsay:

I travel the world for the perfect tea
Everybody’s looking for Darjeeling

Some of them want to infuse you
Some of them want to be infused by you

girldoesnothing:

tonidorsay:

I travel the world for the perfect tea

Everybody’s looking for Darjeeling

Some of them want to infuse you

Some of them want to be infused by you

(Source: georgetakei)

thebiopsy:

Perhaps the most enjoyable vaccination video I’ve ever seen. Have you seen a health care provider ever do this? I should add it to my repertoire. 

the-old-folk-blues asked
Why is it that the ethnicity of your characters is so important to visual adaptions when you rarely, if ever, mention it in your prose?

neil-gaiman:

muchymozzarella:

neil-gaiman:

I don’t really understand the question. If the ethnicity of the characters wasn’t in the prose it wouldn’t be mentioned at all in the adaptations and nobody would care. If you are paying attention you will find all sorts of people in the books, with all sorts of backgrounds. 

And it probably came from comics, in which I could have someone drawn as being part of a particular race or ethnicity and then not have to have them talk about being part of that ethnicity, but simply get on with the business of being in the story and behaving as that person, with that point of view, which would include ethnicity, would behave.

It’s important because representation

And also because I was stupid enough to think Fat Charlie was white for the entirety of Anansi Boys until in hindsight I realized what having Anansi for a dad would obviously mean 

Neil may not always say explicitly what the characters’ ethnicities are but he implies them enough, and if you’re paying attention, you’ll be able to figure it out. 

And maybe this is difficult to understand but as someone who’s grown up a bibliophile, who was so bombarded by white characters that I default to Caucasian in my head even when the character is decidedly nonwhite, it’s important to shake off those years of idiotic Western/Caucasian-centricity by portraying characters as other ethnicities.

Exactly.


Louis Armstrong plays for his wife, Lucille, in front of the Sphinx and Great pyramids in Giza, Egypt, 1961.

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife, Lucille, in front of the Sphinx and Great pyramids in Giza, Egypt, 1961.

(Source: vintageblack2)